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Allergy

Allergy

 

Allergy
Image Number: 186-044
Dimensions: 16 x 12 @ 300 DPI
Media Used: Acrylic, Pencil
Formats Available: Digital, Reflec
Title: Allergy
Customization: Available
Image Description:  Cross-section of nose with inset of histamine reaction to allergin.

© Bonnie Hofkin
Artist/Company Bio:

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Additional Related Images to:
Allergy


  View Image #130-01963 Allergy #130-01963  
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This medical exhibit contrasts normal nasal passage anatomy with allergic rhinitis in a series of four illustrations. The first two graphics depict cut-away views of the normal nasal area with labels for nasal septum, superior, middle and inferior nasal conchae, pharyngeal orifice of the auditory, (eustachian) tube, and the maxillary sinus. The next two graphics display the same views and labels, this time with captions indicating the inflammation of the nasal mucosa with exudate in the airway. May be customized by editing labels, or by combining artwork with graphics from our 15,000 image library.


  View Image #186-044 Allergy #186-044  
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Cross-section of nose with inset of histamine reaction to allergin.


  View Image #156-001 Allergy #156-001  
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Girl child as glass style face and neck. Nasopharyngeal tract and ear canal in face. Allergins silhouetted in background. Also available without allergens. To view similar images and animations view our portfolio or web site.


  View Image #118-077 Allergy, Hypersensitivity Anaphylactic Response #118-077  
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Allergy, Anaphylactic Response. Allergy, Hypersensitivity Anaphylactic Responsecharacterized by excessive activation of mast cells and basophils by IgE, resulting in a systemic inflammatory response that can result in symptoms as benign as a runny nose, to life-threatening anaphylactic shock and death. Type 1 hypersensitivity is an allergic reaction provoked by reexposure to a specific type of antigen referred to as an allergen. Exposure may be by ingestion, inhalation, injection, or direct contact. The difference between a normal immune response and a type I hypersensitive response is that plasma cells secrete IgE. This class of antibodies binds to Fc receptors on the surface of tissue mast cells and blood basophils. Mast cells and basophils coated by IgE are "sensitized." Later exposure to the same allergen, cross-links the bound IgE on sensitized cells resulting in degranulation and the secretion of pharmacologically active mediators such as histamine, leukotriene, and prostaglandin that act on the surrounding tissues. The principal effects of these products are vasodilation and smooth-muscle contraction. The reaction may be either local or systemic. Symptoms vary from mild irritation to sudden death from anaphylactic shock. Treatment usually involves epinephrine, antihistamines, and corticosteroids.


  View Image #118-076 Allergy, Hypersensitivity Anaphylactic Response #118-076  
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Allergic Hypersensitivity Response, Anaphylaxic Response. An allergy is an abnormal, acquired sensitivity to a given substance, including pollen, drugs, or numerous environmental triggers. Type I hypersensitivity is characterized by excessive activation of mast cells and basophils by IgE, resulting in a systemic inflammatory response that can result in symptoms as benign as a runny nose, to life-threatening anaphylactic shock and death. Type 1 hypersensitivity is an allergic reaction provoked by reexposure to a specific type of antigen referred to as an allergen. Exposure may be by ingestion, inhalation, injection, or direct contact. The difference between a normal immune response and a type I hypersensitive response is that plasma cells secrete IgE. This class of antibodies binds to Fc receptors on the surface of tissue mast cells and blood basophils. Mast cells and basophils coated by IgE are "sensitized." Later exposure to the same allergen, cross-links the bound IgE on sensitized cells resulting in degranulation and the secretion of pharmacologically active mediators such as histamine, leukotriene, and prostaglandin that act on the surrounding tissues. The principal effects of these products are vasodilation and smooth-muscle contraction. The reaction may be either local or systemic. Symptoms vary from mild irritation to sudden death from anaphylactic shock. Treatment usually involves epinephrine, antihistamines, and corticosteroids.

 
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