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Deconvolution of Chromatin to form DNA Double Helix

Deconvolution of Chromatin to form DNA Double Helix

 

Deconvolution of Chromatin to form DNA Double Helix
Image Number: 152-096
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Media Used: Mixed
Formats Available: Digital, Trans
Title: Deconvolution of Chromatin to form DNA Double Helix
Customization: Available
Image Description:  Shows the deconvolution of chromatin to form DNA double helix.

© Isabel Christensen, Medical Ar
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Deconvolution of Chromatin to form DNA Double Helix


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Shows the deconvolution of chromatin to form DNA double helix.


  View Image #118-084 DNA Helix Chromosome #118-084  
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DNA Helix Chromosome. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a nucleic acid that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms. The main role of DNA molecules is the long-term storage of information. DNA is often compared to a set of blueprints, since it contains the instructions needed to construct other components of cells, such as proteins and RNA molecules. The DNA segments that carry this genetic information are called genes, but other DNA sequences have structural purposes, or are involved in regulating the use of this genetic information. Chemically, DNA is a long polymer of simple units called nucleotides, with a backbone made of sugars and phosphate groups joined by ester bonds. Attached to each sugar is one of four types of molecules called bases. It is the sequence of these four bases along the backbone that encodes information. This information is read using the genetic code, which specifies the sequence of the amino acids within proteins. The code is read by copying stretches of DNA into the related nucleic acid RNA, in a process called transcription. Within cells, DNA is organized into structures called chromosomes. These chromosomes are duplicated before cells divide, in a process called DNA replication. Eukaryotic organisms such as animals, plants, and fungi store their DNA inside the cell nucleus, while in prokaryotes such as bacteria it is found in the cell's cytoplasm. Within the chromosomes, chromatin proteins such as histones compact and organize DNA. These compact structures guide the interactions between DNA and other proteins, helping control which parts of the DNA are transcribed.


  View Image #118-117 DNA Chromosome Helix #118-117  
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DNA Chromosome Helix. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a nucleic acid that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms. The main role of DNA molecules is the long-term storage of information. DNA is often compared to a set of blueprints, since it contains the instructions needed to construct other components of cells, such as proteins and RNA molecules. The DNA segments that carry this genetic information are called genes, but other DNA sequences have structural purposes, or are involved in regulating the use of this genetic information. Chemically, DNA is a long polymer of simple units called nucleotides, with a backbone made of sugars and phosphate groups joined by ester bonds. Attached to each sugar is one of four types of molecules called bases. It is the sequence of these four bases along the backbone that encodes information. This information is read using the genetic code, which specifies the sequence of the amino acids within proteins. The code is read by copying stretches of DNA into the related nucleic acid RNA, in a process called transcription. Within cells, DNA is organized into structures called chromosomes. These chromosomes are duplicated before cells divide, in a process called DNA replication. Eukaryotic organisms such as animals, plants, and fungi store their DNA inside the cell nucleus, while in prokaryotes such as bacteria it is found in the cell's cytoplasm. Within the chromosomes, chromatin proteins such as histones compact and organize DNA. These compact structures guide the interactions between DNA and other proteins, helping control which parts of the DNA are transcribed.


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Dna double helix unravelling to expose a diseased ovary. Classical sketch of uterus, fallopian tubes and vagina in background. Commercial requests only. Minimum license fee is $300. No student or classroom inquiries will be answered. Copyright Teri J. McDermott


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Dramatic landscape showing a possible model for the organization of DNA/Genetics and protein in chromosomes within the human cell. Includes the DNA double helix. Commercial inquiries only. No classroom or student requests will be answered. Minimum license fee is $300. ŠTeri J. McDermott

 
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