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Mitosis, Cells

Mitosis, Cells

 

Mitosis, Cells
Image Number: 118-113
Dimensions: 1100 X 900
Media Used: Digital Photoshop
Formats Available: Whatever required
Title: Mitosis, Cells
Customization: Available
Image Description:  Mitosis Cells. There are two types of cell division: mitosis and meiosis. Most of the time when people refer to cell division, they mean mitosis, the process of making new body cells. Meiosis is the type of cell division that creates egg and sperm cells. Mitosis is a fundamental process for life. During mitosis, a cell duplicates all of its contents, including its chromosomes, and splits to form two identical daughter cells. Because this process is so critical, the steps of mitosis are carefully controlled by a number of genes. When mitosis is not regulated correctly, health problems such as cancer can result.

© Catherine Twomey
Portfolio
Artist/Company Bio:
Professional yet creative. Detailed yet capable of understanding and illustrating the most complex concept in the most straightforward way. Deadline oriented and accurate. Producer of some of the most beautifully colored and rendered work found today. Catherine Twomey is a Board Certified member of the Association of Medical Illustrators and a Founding member of the Illustrators Partnership of America. She has had her own successful business creating art for science and the healthcare industry for over 20 years. She has received many Awards of Excellence from the RX/Art Directors Club in New York City, the Association of Medical Illustrators and numerous other venues. Estimates are provided without charge. The stock section of Indexed Visuals carries 75 of Catherine's images available for licensing. Most images are produced in Photoshop layers, making it possible to modify images to fit your needs. Catherine's website at http://www.artistsart.com provides more samples and information. Catherine is a graduate of the Medical Illustration/Biomedical Visualization Program of the University of Illinois, B.S. in Biocommunication Arts/Medical Illustration, including U. of I. Medical School Sciences: human gross anatomy, physiology, neuroanatomy, histology, embryology, pathology. She also has a Masters Degree from Northern Illinois University Graduate School, M.S. in Art Education, Summa Cum Laude. Catherine provides her services to biotech and pharmaceutical companies, attorneys, major medical publishers of textbooks and journals, and consumer publications. Her illustrations have appeared worldwide, from every WalMart to the NBC Home show to the largest medical convention, RSNA (Radiogical Society of North America).

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Additional Related Images to:
Mitosis, Cells


  View Image #118-113 Mitosis, Cells #118-113  
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Mitosis Cells. There are two types of cell division: mitosis and meiosis. Most of the time when people refer to cell division, they mean mitosis, the process of making new body cells. Meiosis is the type of cell division that creates egg and sperm cells. Mitosis is a fundamental process for life. During mitosis, a cell duplicates all of its contents, including its chromosomes, and splits to form two identical daughter cells. Because this process is so critical, the steps of mitosis are carefully controlled by a number of genes. When mitosis is not regulated correctly, health problems such as cancer can result.


  View Image #118-111 Mitosis Cell Division #118-111  
 | Related Images [Click Here]
Mitosis Cells. Mitosis is a process of cell division which results in the production of two daughter cells from a single parent cell. The daughter cells are identical to one another and to the original parent cell. In a typical animal cell, mitosis can be divided into four principals stages: Prophase: The chromatin, diffuse in interphase, condenses into chromosomes. Each chromosome has duplicated and now consists of two sister chromatids. At the end of prophase, the nuclear envelope breaks down into vesicles. Metaphase: The chromosomes align at the equitorial plate and are held in place by microtubules attached to the mitotic spindle and to part of the centromere. Anaphase: The centromeres divide. Sister chromatids separate and move toward the corresponding poles. Telophase: Daughter chromosomes arrive at the poles and the microtubules disappear. The condensed chromatin expands and the nuclear envelope reappears. Cytokinesis: The cytoplasm divides, the cell membrane pinches inward ultimately producing two daughter cells .


  View Image #118-114 Meiosis, Cells #118-114  
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Meiosis, Cells. Meiosis and cell division is the process by which one diploid eukaryotic cell divides to generate four haploid cells often called gametes. The word "meiosis" comes from the Greek meioun, meaning "to make smaller," since it results in a reduction in chromosome number in the gamete cell. Among fungi, spores in which the haploid nuclei are at first disseminated are called meiospores, or more specifically, ascospores in asci (Ascomycota) and basidospores on basidia (Basidiomycota). Meiosis is essential for sexual reproduction and therefore occurs in all eukaryotes (including single-celled organisms) that reproduce sexually. A few eukaryotes, notably the Bdelloid rotifers, have lost the ability to carry out meiosis and have acquired the ability to reproduce by parthenogenesis. Meiosis does not occur in archaea or bacteria, which reproduce via asexual processes such as mitosis or binary fission. During meiosis, the genome of a diploid germ cell, which is composed of long segments of DNA packaged into chromosomes, undergoes DNA replication followed by two rounds of division, resulting in haploid cells called gametes. Each gamete contains one complete set of chromosomes, or half of the genetic content of the original cell. These resultant haploid cells can fuse with other haploid cells of the opposite sex or mating type during fertilization to create a new diploid cell, or zygote. Thus, the division mechanism of meiosis is a reciprocal process to the joining of two genomes that occurs at fertilization. Because the chromosomes of each parent undergo genetic recombination during meiosis, each gamete, and thus each zygote, will have a unique genetic blueprint encoded in its DNA. In other words, meiosis and sexual reproduction produce genetic variation. Meiosis uses many of the same biochemical mechanisms employed during mitosis to accomplish the redistribution of chromosomes. There are several features unique to meiosis, most importantly the pairing and genetic recombination between homologous chromosomes.


  View Image #100-063 Mitosis - Cycle of #100-063  
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Circular diagram showing the cycle of mitosis. Includes interphase, prophase, metaphase, anaphase, telophase, and the respective changes to the nucleus and chromosomes.


  View Image #125-011 Fat Cells #125-011  
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Microscopic view of fat cells.

 
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