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Coronary Stenosis, Heart Occlusion

Coronary Stenosis, Heart Occlusion

 

Coronary Stenosis, Heart Occlusion
Image Number: 118-087
Dimensions: 1200 X 900
Media Used: Digital Photoshop
Formats Available: Whatever required
Title: Coronary Stenosis, Heart Occlusion
Customization: Available
Image Description:  Coronary Stenosis, Heart Occlusion. Stenosis and Restenosis of Coronary Arteries What are stenosis and restenosis? Stenosis means constriction or narrowing. A coronary artery that's constricted or narrowed is called stenosed. Buildup of fat, cholesterol and other substances over time may clog the artery. To learn more about stenosis of heart valves, see "Heart Valves" in this guide. One way to widen a coronary artery is by using percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI, or balloon angioplasty). Some patients who undergo PCI have restenosis (renarrowing) of the widened segment within about six months of the procedure. Restenosed arteries may have to undergo another angioplasty. One way to help prevent restenosis is by using stents. A stent is a wire mesh tube used to prop open an artery after angioplasty. Restenosis is less common in stented arteries. Studies are under way using stents covered with drugs that show promise for improving the long-term success of this procedure. Stenosis can also occur after a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) operation. This type of heart surgery is done to reroute, or "bypass," blood around clogged arteries. This improves the supply of blood and oxygen to the heart. In this case, the stenosis may occur in the transplanted blood vessel segments and require angioplasty or atherectomy (read more about atherectomy) to reopen them.

© Catherine Twomey
Portfolio
Artist/Company Bio:
Professional yet creative. Detailed yet capable of understanding and illustrating the most complex concept in the most straightforward way. Deadline oriented and accurate. Producer of some of the most beautifully colored and rendered work found today. Catherine Twomey is a Board Certified member of the Association of Medical Illustrators and a Founding member of the Illustrators Partnership of America. She has had her own successful business creating art for science and the healthcare industry for over 20 years. She has received many Awards of Excellence from the RX/Art Directors Club in New York City, the Association of Medical Illustrators and numerous other venues. Estimates are provided without charge. The stock section of Indexed Visuals carries 75 of Catherine's images available for licensing. Most images are produced in Photoshop layers, making it possible to modify images to fit your needs. Catherine's website at http://www.artistsart.com provides more samples and information. Catherine is a graduate of the Medical Illustration/Biomedical Visualization Program of the University of Illinois, B.S. in Biocommunication Arts/Medical Illustration, including U. of I. Medical School Sciences: human gross anatomy, physiology, neuroanatomy, histology, embryology, pathology. She also has a Masters Degree from Northern Illinois University Graduate School, M.S. in Art Education, Summa Cum Laude. Catherine provides her services to biotech and pharmaceutical companies, attorneys, major medical publishers of textbooks and journals, and consumer publications. Her illustrations have appeared worldwide, from every WalMart to the NBC Home show to the largest medical convention, RSNA (Radiogical Society of North America).

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Additional Related Images to:
Coronary Stenosis, Heart Occlusion


  View Image #118-087 Coronary Stenosis, Heart Occlusion #118-087  
 | Related Images [Click Here]
Coronary Stenosis, Heart Occlusion. Stenosis and Restenosis of Coronary Arteries What are stenosis and restenosis? Stenosis means constriction or narrowing. A coronary artery that's constricted or narrowed is called stenosed. Buildup of fat, cholesterol and other substances over time may clog the artery. To learn more about stenosis of heart valves, see "Heart Valves" in this guide. One way to widen a coronary artery is by using percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI, or balloon angioplasty). Some patients who undergo PCI have restenosis (renarrowing) of the widened segment within about six months of the procedure. Restenosed arteries may have to undergo another angioplasty. One way to help prevent restenosis is by using stents. A stent is a wire mesh tube used to prop open an artery after angioplasty. Restenosis is less common in stented arteries. Studies are under way using stents covered with drugs that show promise for improving the long-term success of this procedure. Stenosis can also occur after a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) operation. This type of heart surgery is done to reroute, or "bypass," blood around clogged arteries. This improves the supply of blood and oxygen to the heart. In this case, the stenosis may occur in the transplanted blood vessel segments and require angioplasty or atherectomy (read more about atherectomy) to reopen them.


  View Image #130-07194 Heart Attack - Coronary Artery Disease #130-07194  
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Depicts progressive coronary artery disease of the heart, showing normal blood flow throught the left main coronary artery contrasted with a blocked version with 95% occlusion. The left anterior descending (LAD) branch of the left coronary artery is called the "Artery of Sudden Death" because it supplies the left ventricle heart muscle. When the LAD is suddenly occluded, a fatal myocardial infarction, or heart attack, usually occurs. May be customized by editing labels, or by combining artwork with graphics from our 15,000 image library.


  View Image #118-092 Angina Stenosis Ischemia Heart #118-092  
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Angina Stenosis Ischemia Heart. A stenosis is an abnormal narrowing in a blood vessel or other tubular organ or structure. Vascular stenosis are often associated with a noise (bruit) resulting from the turbulent flow over the narrowed blood vessel. This bruit can be head with a stethescopre. Other diagnostic methods are imaging such as ultrasound, MFI, CT or CT angiography. Angina pectoris, commonly known as angina, is chest pain due to ischemia (a lack of blood and hence oxygen supply) of the heart muscle, generally due to obstruction or spasm of the coronary arteries (the heart's blood vessels). Coronary artery disease, the main cause of angina, is due to atherosclerosis of the cardiac arteries. The term derives from the Greek ankhon ("strangling") and the Latin pectus ("chest"), and can therefore be translated as "a strangling feeling in the chest". It is common to equate severity of angina with risk of fatal cardiac events. There is a weak relationship between severity of pain and degree of oxygen deprivation in the heart muscle (i.e. there can be severe pain with little or no risk of a heart attack, and a heart attack can occur without pain). Worsening ("crescendo") angina attacks, sudden-onset angina at rest, and angina lasting more than 15 minutes are symptoms of unstable angina (usually grouped with similar conditions as the acute coronary syndrome). As these may herald myocardial infarction (a heart attack), they require urgent medical attention and are generally treated as a presumed heart attack.


  View Image #130-08057 Coronary Artery Disease #130-08057  
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Coronary Artery Disease with Subsequent Heart Attack. Clear depiction showing blocked coronary arteries, including the left main coronary, left anterior descending (LAD) and the left circumflex. Each artery shows evidence of severe occlusion and stenosis. The resulting myocardial infarction, or heart attack, is fatal. May be customized by editing labels, or by combining artwork with graphics from our 15,000 image library.


  View Image #156-017 Coronary Heart Disease #156-017  
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Coronary Heart Disease. Cross section of coronary artery with plaque. To view similar images and animations view our portfolio or web site.

 
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