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Rotational Atherectomy - PTCRA

Rotational Atherectomy - PTCRA

 

Rotational Atherectomy - PTCRA
Image Number: 101-105
Dimensions: 8x10@300dpi
Media Used: airbrush and photoshop
Formats Available: digital
Title: Rotational Atherectomy - PTCRA
Customization: Available
Image Description:  PTCRA, Percutaneous transluminal coronary atherectomy pulverizes the plaque into microscopic particles and disperses them into the circulation. Also included is heart showing 70% stenosis of left circumflex artery.

© Bert Oppenheim
Portfolio
Artist/Company Bio:
Bert received his BFA from the Cleveland Institute of Art in Medical Illustration and a Masters Degree from the Department of Art as Applied to Medicine from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He has been an active member of the Association of Medical Illustrators for 20 years and recently completed a 4 year term on the Board of Governors. He currently lives outside of Boston where he maintains his freelance illustration and animation business. Specialties include editorial illustration and 3D computer animation for the pharmaceutical and advertising markets. Over the past 14 years Bert has created high-end 3D computer animation using Softimage on an SGI platform.

More by this Artist
www.ivwebsites.com
 

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Rotational Atherectomy - PTCRA


  View Image #101-029 Atherectomy- PTCRA #101-029  
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Percutaneous transluminal coronary rotational atherectomy (PTCRA) pulverizes plaque into microscopic particles and disperses them into the circulation.


  View Image #101-105 Rotational Atherectomy - PTCRA #101-105  
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PTCRA, Percutaneous transluminal coronary atherectomy pulverizes the plaque into microscopic particles and disperses them into the circulation. Also included is heart showing 70% stenosis of left circumflex artery.


  View Image #136-007 Atherectomy - Rotational #136-007  
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A metal burr with a diamond coated tip removes atherosclerotic plaque, grinding it into a small particulate. Rotational Atherectomy.


  View Image #130-08249 Spine - Injury of the Vertebral Artery #130-08249  
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This medical exhibit shows two anterior views of the upper cervical spine and vertebral arteries. In the first image depicts normal anatomy contrasted with the second image, a Rotational Injury of the Vertebral Artery, which can sometimes be seen in violent whiplash injuries. May be customized by editing labels, or by combining artwork with graphics from our 15,000 image library.


  View Image #118-087 Coronary Stenosis, Heart Occlusion #118-087  
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Coronary Stenosis, Heart Occlusion. Stenosis and Restenosis of Coronary Arteries What are stenosis and restenosis? Stenosis means constriction or narrowing. A coronary artery that's constricted or narrowed is called stenosed. Buildup of fat, cholesterol and other substances over time may clog the artery. To learn more about stenosis of heart valves, see "Heart Valves" in this guide. One way to widen a coronary artery is by using percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI, or balloon angioplasty). Some patients who undergo PCI have restenosis (renarrowing) of the widened segment within about six months of the procedure. Restenosed arteries may have to undergo another angioplasty. One way to help prevent restenosis is by using stents. A stent is a wire mesh tube used to prop open an artery after angioplasty. Restenosis is less common in stented arteries. Studies are under way using stents covered with drugs that show promise for improving the long-term success of this procedure. Stenosis can also occur after a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) operation. This type of heart surgery is done to reroute, or "bypass," blood around clogged arteries. This improves the supply of blood and oxygen to the heart. In this case, the stenosis may occur in the transplanted blood vessel segments and require angioplasty or atherectomy (read more about atherectomy) to reopen them.

 
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